Dr Jason Lodge

Senior Lecturer in Higher Education

Melbourne CSHE

Jason's areas of expertise are in cognitive science, educational psychology, higher education and educational technology. His research focuses on the cognitive and emotional factors that influence student learning and the student experience in adult educational settings.

Jason is a Senior Lecturer in Higher Education and an experienced educator in psychology and higher education. Jason joined the Melbourne CSHE in 2014. He is a psychological scientist by profession and is affiliated with the national Australian Research Council funded Science of Learning Research Centre. He was also the recipient of the 2014 Australian Psychological Society Early Career Teaching Award and the 2016 Melbourne Graduate School of Education Teaching Excellence Award.

Jason's areas of expertise are in cognitive science, educational psychology, higher education and educational technology. His research focuses on the cognitive and emotional factors that influence student learning and the student experience in adult educational settings. He is predominantly interested in how educational technology is influencing the development of metacognition, critical thinking, expertise and professional ways of being. Jason also has specialist knowledge and experience in academic development, learning analytics, curriculum development, design for learning and assessment and evaluation in higher education. Jason is part of the Educational Technology Research Group.

Jason has over 13 years of experience in teaching in university settings as well as a decade of experience in corporate and vocational training. Jason has earned a Bachelor of Psychology with Honours from James Cook University, a Graduate Certificate in Business from Monash University, a Master of Higher Education from Macquarie University, a Master of Learning Sciences and Technology from The University of Sydney and a PhD in Psychological Science also from James Cook University. 

Recent research and development grants

2017: Effective design of digital learning environments for overcoming scientific misconceptions. J. M. Lodge. University of Melbourne Early Career Grant Scheme. (Chief Investigator). Funding: $19,998

2017: Increasing student feedback in a large-group setting. P. Howe, J. M. Lodge. MDHS Learning and Teaching Initiative Seed Funding, University of Melbourne role: (Co-chief Investigator). Funding: $4904

2016: Facilitating active learning in small group settings: Discipline-based professional development for sessional teachers. C. Baik, P. Lee Stecum, M. Livett et al. University of Melbourne Learning and Teaching Initiatives. Funding: $29,389

2016: Pedagogical and production strategies for videos that support student learning. J. M. Lodge, J. Horvath, L. Corrin et al., University of Melbourne Learning and Teaching Initiatives (Chief Investigator). Funding: $27,917

2016: Targeting misconceptions as a pedagogical trigger for student engagement. H. Verkade, T. Mulhern et al., University of Melbourne Learning and Teaching Initiatives. Funding: $29,837.

2014: Innovative perspectives and approaches for enhancing the student experience. H. Coates et al. Office for Learning and Teaching Strategic Priority Project. Funding: $326,000.

2013: Using colour coding to cue second language learning in higher education. J. McWilliam & J. Lodge. University of Queensland Seed Funding. Funding $2,000.

2012: Improving technical thinking in first year ICT courses. S. Venema & J. Lodge. Griffith Grants for Learning & Teaching. (Co-chief investigator) Funding: $4,500.

2011: Establishing a framework for transforming student engagement, success and retention in higher education institutions. K. Nelson, G. Joughin, G. Thomas, J. Lodge, J. Clarke & I. Stoodley. Australian Learning & Teaching Council Innovation and Development Grant. Funding: $220,000.

2011: Investigating the second year slump at Griffith University. S-J Gregory & J. Lodge. Griffith Grants for Learning & Teaching. Funding: $20,000.

2010: Investigating online communities, student selection and DVDs as tools for assisting in enhancing the student experience in clinical psychology. E. Strodl, R. Schweitzer, J. Lodge et al. QUT Learning and Teaching Development Grants (3 sub-projects funded). Total funding: $10,802.

Recent publications

Book

Horvath, J. C., Lodge, J. M., & Hattie, J. A. C. (2017). From the laboratory to the classroom: Translating learning sciences for teachers. Abingdon, Routledge. https://www.routledge.com/products/9781138649644

Book chapters

Lodge, J. M. & Corrin, L. (2017). The connected community of practice in educational technology: A model for future networked professional development? In. J. McDonald & A. Cater-Steel (Eds.) Implementing communities of practice in higher education - Dreamers and schemers. Berlin: Springer.

Dabrowski, A. & Lodge, J. M. (2017). Pedagogy, practice, and the allure of open online courses: Implications for schools and their students. In. A. Marcus-Quinn & T. Hourigan (Eds.) Handbook for digital learning in K-12 schools. Berlin: Springer. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-33808-8_27

Lodge, J. M. & Horvath, J. C. (2017). Science of learning and digital learning environments. In J. C. Horvath, J. M. Lodge, & J. A. C. Hattie (eds.) From the laboratory to the classroom: Translating learning sciences for teachers. Abingdon, UK: Routledge.

Horvath, J. C. & Lodge, J. M. (2017). A framework for organizing and translating research in the learning sciences. In J. C. Horvath, J. M. Lodge, & J. A. C. Hattie (eds.) From the laboratory to the classroom: Translating learning sciences for teachers. Abingdon, UK: Routledge.

Lewis, M. J. & Lodge, J. M. (2016). Keep calm and credential on: Linking learning, life and work practices in a complex world. In Ifenthaler, D., Bellin-Mularski, N., Mah, D.-K. (eds.) Foundations of digital badges and micro-credentials: Demonstrating and recognizing knowledge and competencies. Berlin: Springer. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-15425-1_3

Venema, S., Drew, S., & Lodge, J. M. (2015). Peer observation as a collaborative vehicle for innovation in incorporating educational technology into teaching: A case study. In C. Klopper & S. Drew (Eds.) Teaching for learning and learning for teaching: Cases in context of peer review of teaching in Higher Education. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.

Lodge, J. M., O’Connor, E., Burton, L., & Shaw, R. (2015). Applying cognitive science to critical thinking among higher education students. In M. Davies & R. Barnett (eds.) The Palgrave handbook of critical thinking in higher education. New York: Palgrave.

Lodge, J. M. & Lewis, M. J. (2015). Professional learning through MOOCs?: A trans-disciplinary framework for building knowledge, inquiry, and expertise. In L. McKay & J. Lenarcic (Eds.) Macro-Level Learning through Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs): Strategies and Predictions for the Future. Hershey, PA, USA: IGI Global.

Journal articles

Lodge, J. M., Cottrell, D., & Hansen, L. (in press). Learning styles at the crossroads of the laboratory and the classroom. Learning: Research and Practice

Lodge, J. M. & Corrin, L. (in press). What data and analytics can and do say about effective learning. Nature npj Science of Learning

Bosanquet, A., Mealey, A., Matthews, K. E. & Lodge, J. M. (2016). Redefining 'early career' in academia: A collective narrative approach. Higher Education Research & Development http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07294360.2016.1263934 (pre-press version)

Arguel, A., Lockyer, L., Lipp, O., Lodge, J. M., & Kennedy, G. (2016). Inside out: ways of detecting learners’ confusion for successful e-learning. Journal of Educational Computing Research. DOI: 10.1177/0735633116674732 (pre-press version)

Piromchai, P., Ioannou, I., Wijewickrema, S., Kasemsiri, P., Lodge, J. M., Kennedy, G., O'Leary, S. (2016). The effects of anatomical variation on trainee performance in a virtual reality temporal bone surgery simulator – a pilot study. The Journal of Laryngology & Otology. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0022215116009233 (pre-press version)

Lodge, J. M., Kennedy, G. & Lockyer, L. (2016). Editorial: Brain, mind and educational technology. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 32 (6), i-iii. http://dx.doi.org/10.14742/ajet.3443

Pachman, M., Arguel, A., Lockyer, L., Kennedy, G., & Lodge, J. M. (2016). Eye tracking and early detection of confusion in digital learning environments: Proof of concept. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 32(6), 58-71. http://dx.doi.org/10.14742/ajet.3060

Jabbar, A., Gasser, R. B. & Lodge, J. M. (2016). Can new digital technologies support parasitology teaching and learning? Trends in Parasitology, 32, 522-530. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pt.2016.04.004

Lodge, J. M. (2016). Do the learning sciences have a place in higher education research? Higher Education Research & Development, 35 (3), 634-637. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07294360.2015.1094204

Mouasher, A. & Lodge, J. M. (2016). The search for pedagogical dynamism: Design patterns and the unselfconscious process. Educational Technology & Society, 19 (2), 274-285. http://www.ifets.info/journals/19_2/20.pdf

Lodge, J. M., Hansen, L., & Cottrell, D. (2016). Modality preference and learning style theories: Rethinking the role of sensory modality in learning. Learning: Research and Practice, 2 (1), 4-17. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/23735082.2015.1083115

Lodge, J. M. (2015). Transitioning into academia: The challenges and opportunities for early career psychologists and psychological scientists. InPsych, 37 (6), 14-15. https://www.psychology.org.au/inpsych/2015/dec/lodge/

Gregory, M. S-J. & Lodge, J. M. (2015). Academic workload: The silent barrier to the implementation of technology-enhanced learning strategies in higher education. Distance Education, 36 (2), 210-230. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01587919.2015.1055056

Larmar, S. & Lodge, J. M. (2014). Metacognitive capital as a predictor of first year university student retention and engagement. International Journal of the First Year in Higher Education, 5 (1), 93-105. http://dx.doi.org/10.5204/intjfyhe.v5i1.193

Lodge, J. M. & Bosanquet, A. (2014). Evaluating quality learning in higher education: Re-examining the evidence. Quality in Higher Education, 20 (1), 3-23. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13538322.2013.849787

Matthews, K. E., Lodge, J. M., & Bosanquet, A. (2014). Early career academic perceptions, attitudes and professional development activities: Questioning the teaching and research gap to further academic development. International Journal of Academic Development, 19 (2) 112-124. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1360144X.2012.724421  

Schweitzer, R., Khawaja, N., Strodl, E., Lodge, J. M., King, R., Coyne, J., & Proctor, D. (2014). Towards a model for student selection in clinical psychology. Clinical Psychologist, 18 (3), 125-132. DOI: 10.1111/cp.12025 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cp.12025/full

Venema, S. & Lodge, J. M. (2013). Capturing dynamic presentation: Using technology to enhance the chalk and the talk. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 29 (1), 20-31. http://dx.doi.org/10.14742/ajet.62

Loughlin, W., Gregory, S-J., Harrison, G., & Lodge, J. M. (2013). Beyond the first year experience in science: Identifying the need for a supportive learning and teaching environment for second year students. International Journal of Science & Mathematics Education, 21 (4), 13-26. http://openjournals.library.usyd.edu.au/index.php/CAL/article/view/7297/0

Lodge, J. M. (2012). Implementing a Principal Tutor to increase student engagement and retention within the first year of a professional program. International Journal of the First Year in Higher Education, 3 (1), 9-20. DOI: 10.5204/intjfyhe.v3i1.101 https://fyhejournal.com/article/view/101

Smyth, E. & Lodge, J. M. (2012). Orientation Online: An online introduction to university for assisting commencing students transition to higher education. International Journal of the First Year in Higher Education, 3 (1) 83-90. DOI: 10.5204/intjfyhe.v3i1.104 https://fyhejournal.com/article/viewFile/104/107

Lodge, J. M. (2010). Communicating with first year students; so many channels but is anyone listening? A practice report. International Journal of the First Year in Higher Education, 1 (1),100-105. DOI: 10.5204/intjfyhe.v1i1.23 https://fyhejournal.com/article/view/23

Referred conference papers

Arguel, A., Lodge, J. M., Pachman, M. & de Barba, P. (2016). Confidence drives exploration strategies in interactive simulations. In S. Barker, S. Dawson, A. Pardo, & C. Colvin (Eds.), Show Me the Learning. Proceedings ASCILITE 2016 Adelaide (pp. 33-42).

Wiseman, P.J., Kennedy, G.E. & Lodge, J. M. (2016). Models for understanding student engagement in digital learning environments. In S. Barker, S. Dawson, A. Pardo, & C. Colvin (Eds.), Show Me the Learning. Proceedings ASCILITE 2016 Adelaide (pp. 666-671).

Kennedy, G. & Lodge, J. M. (2016). All roads lead to Rome: Tracking students’ affect as they overcome misconceptions. In S. Barker, S. Dawson, A. Pardo, & C. Colvin (Eds.), Show Me the Learning. Proceedings ASCILITE 2016 Adelaide (pp. 318-328).

Lodge, J. M. & Kennedy, G. E. (2015). Prior knowledge, confidence and understanding in interactive tutorials and simulations. In T. Reiners, B.R. von Konsky, D. Gibson, V. Chang, L. Irving, & K. Clarke (Eds.), Globally connected, digitally enabled. Proceedings ascilite 2015 in Perth (178-188).

Griffiths, D. & Lodge, J. M. (2015). Modelling psychological factors for predicting the success of non-traditional students. Students, Transitions, Achievement, Retention & Success Conference, 2015, Melbourne, Australia. DOI: 10.13140/RG.2.1.1566.7921

Timms, M. & Lodge, J. M. (2015). Assessment in interactive learning environments. Australian Council for Education Research Conference 2015, Melbourne, Australia.

Barac, K., Davies, L., Duffy, S., & Lodge, J. M. (2014). Designing online courses: Investigating a sustainable framework through professional learning. International Consortium for Educational Development Conference, Stockholm, Sweden.

Lodge, J. M. (2013). From the laboratory to the classroom: Translating the learning sciences for use in technology-enhanced learning. Australian Council for Education Research Conference 2013 – How the Brain Learns: What Lessons are there for Teaching? Melbourne, Australia.

Barac, K., Davies, L., Duffy, S., Aitken, N. & Lodge, J. M. (2013). Five stages of online course design: Taking the grief out of converting courses for online delivery. ascilite Conference, Sydney Australia.

Lodge, J. M. & Lewis, M. J. (2012). Pigeon pecks and mouse clicks: Putting the learning back into learning analytics. In M. Brown, M. Hartnett & T. Stewart (Eds.), Future challenges, sustainable futures. Proceedings ascilite Wellington 2012. (Winner, ascilite best concise paper award, 2012).

Venema, S. & Lodge, J. M. (2012). Improving first year, first semester lecture engagement. Proceedings of the 15th International First Year in Higher Education Conference, Brisbane Australia.

Lodge, J. M. (2011). Lost in the noise: The rising tide of digital information and how to manage it. Tertiary Education Management Conference, Gold Coast, Australia.

Lodge, J. M. (2010). Communicating with first year students; so many channels but is anyone listening? Proceedings of the 13th Pacific Rim First Year in Higher Education Conference, Adelaide, South Australia. (Outstanding paper award recipient)

Conference proceedings

Palghat, K., Horvath, J. C., & Lodge, J. M. (2016). The hard problem of ‘educational neuroscience’. 2016 Australian Association of Philosophy Conference. Melbourne, Australia.

Bosanquet, A., Lodge, J. M. & Matthews, K. E. (2016). “I am told it is publications”: Becoming a quantified academic in the measured university. 5th International Academic Identities Conference 2016 'Academic life in the measured university: pleasures, paradoxes and politics’. Sydney, Australia.

Cottrell, D., Berzinski, M. & Lodge, J. M. (2015). Surprise not novelty drives the hypercorrection effect. Australasian Cognitive Neuroscience Society Conference, 2015, Auckland, New Zealand.

Verkade, H. & Lodge, J. M. (2015). The learning strategies and metacognition of second year biochemistry and molecular biology students. COMBIO 2015, Melbourne, Australia.

Lodge, J. M. (2015). Conceptual change in psychology: Why being confused is beneficial for learning. 50th Australian Psychological Society Conference, Gold Coast, Australia.

Lodge, J. M., Lewis, M. J. & Corrin, L. (2015). Scholars in the mist: Navigating the complex fog of data for the enhancement of learning and teaching practice. Higher Education Research & Development Conference 2015, Melbourne, Australia.

Bosanquet, A., Mealey, A., Matthews, K. E., & Lodge, J. M. (2015). Redefining early career academia in uncertain times. Higher Education Research & Development Conference 2015, Melbourne, Australia.

Brooker, A., Lodge, J. M. & Horvath, J. C. (2015). Translating science of learning into effective designs for learning: A case study on the use of visual aids in teaching practice. Higher Education Research & Development Conference 2015, Melbourne, Australia.

Lodge, J. M. & Kennedy, G. E. (2015). Performance and emotional responses in simulation versus tutorial style learning. Australasian Experimental Psychology Conference, 2015, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

Lodge, J. M. (2014). Desirable and difficult: Translating psychological science for enhancing teaching practice. 49th Australian Psychological Society Conference, Hobart, Australia.

Venema, S. & Lodge, J. M. (2013). A quasi-experimental comparison of assessment feedback mechanisms. ascilite Conference, Sydney Australia.

Lodge, J. M. (2013). Where is the space and place for fundamental learning research in higher education? Higher Education Research & Development Conference 2013, Auckland, New Zealand.

Gregory, S-J, Loughlin, W., Harrison, G., Lodge, J. M., & McDonnell, A. (2013). Second year student transitions. Australian Conference on Science and Mathematics Education 2013, Canberra.

Gregory, S-J, Loughlin, W., Lodge, J. M., & Harrison, G. (2012). Building a supportive learning and teaching culture for science academics. Australian Conference on Science and Mathematics Education, Sydney.

Lodge, J. M. (2011). What if student attrition was treated like an illness? An epidemiological model for learning analytics. In G. Williams, P. Statham, N. Brown & B. Cleland (Eds.), Changing Demands, Changing Directions. Proceedings ascilite Hobart 2011. (pp.822-825).

Lodge, J. M., O'Connor, E. L., Ryan, C., Bath, D., & Hansen, L. (2011). Introductions to the profession: Expectations and transitions of beginning psychology students at three universities. 46th Australian Psychological Society Conference, Canberra, Australia.

Lodge, J. M., O'Connor, E. L., Ryan, C., & Hansen, L. (2011). Introductions to the profession: A survey of the expectations of first year psychology students in Australia. 46th Australian Psychological Society Conference, Canberra, Australia.

Hansen, L. & Lodge, J. M. (2011). Introductions to the profession: Co-curricular approach. 46th Australian Psychological Society Conference, Canberra, Australia.

Reece, J., Jones, C., Strodl, E., Beames, L., & Lodge, J. M. (2011). Assessing and developing the practitioner and industry capabilities of psychology students throughout the undergraduate and postgraduate curricula. 46th Australian Psychological Society Conference, Canberra, Australia.

Lodge, J. M., Smith, C., Bath, D., & Bourke, J. (2011). What do learning analytics really tell us about student learning and how do the data inform practice? Higher Education Research & Development Conference 2011, Gold Coast, Australia.

Lodge, J. M. (2011). Beyond Transition pedagogy: Modelling the next generation of strategies to enhance the first year experience. Proceedings of the 14th Pacific Rim First Year in Higher Education Conference.

Lodge, J. M. & Cottrell, D. (2011). If you blink, you will like it: Mere exposure to random geometric shapes in RSVP streams. 38th Experimental Psychology Conference, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

Lodge, J. M. & Cottrell, D. (2010). Processing fluency and distractor devaluation: does the processing of repeatedly presented distractors influence subjective liking? 37th Experimental Psychology Conference, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.

Lodge, J. M. (2010). The benefits of using social networks to increase student engagement – not so obvious? Higher Education Research & Development Conference 2010, Melbourne, Australia.

Recent keynote and invited presentations

Lodge, J. M. (2016). The surprising benefits of confusion in learning. Science of Learning Seminar, Flinders University. (invited talk)

Lodge, J. M., Alhadad, S., Knight, S., Lewis, M. J. & Rogers, T. (2016). What exactly do we mean by ‘learning’ in learning analytics? 2016 Australian Learning Analytics Summer Institute, Adelaide, Australia. (panel session)

Lodge, J. M. (2016). Changing conceptions of culture: Towards a pedagogy of discomfort. Connecting Cultural Competence to Curriculum Event: University of Sydney (invited speaker)

Lodge, J. M., Horvath, J. C. & Hattie, J. (2016). Confusion, error & feedback. Bastow Institute for Educational Leadership Seminar, Melbourne. (symposium session)

Lodge, J. M., Horvath, J. C. & Horton, A. (2016). Video killed the lecturer? A systematic analysis of video use in higher education. Melbourne Centre for the Study of Higher Education Innovations in Teaching and Learning Seminar Series (invited seminar)

Lodge, J. M. (2016). Overcoming the Trump effect: What to do with misconceived but highly confident learners? Educational Innovation Centre, University of Sydney (invited seminar).

Lodge, J. M. & Cottrell, D. (2016). Hypercorrection: snatching conceptual change from the jaws of overconfidence. ARC-SRI Science of Learning Research Centre Seminar, University of Melbourne. (public seminar)

Lodge, J. M., Kennedy, G. E., Dalgarno, B. & Markauskaite, L. (2015). The mind and the machine: Brain, mind and digital learning environments. ascilite Conference, Perth, Australia. (symposium session)

Lodge, J. M. (2015). Educational technologies (Leading innovation in teaching during the rise of the machines). The Pearson National Learning and Teaching Conference 2015, Gold Coast, Australia (invited workshop).

Lodge, J. M. (2015). Educational psychology - Why sometimes it’s important to be confused. The Pearson National Learning and Teaching Conference 2015, Gold Coast, Australia (invited workshop).

Lodge, J. M. (2015). Conceptual change in psychology: Why being confused is beneficial for learning. 50th Australian Psychological Society Conference, Gold Coast, Australia. (invited talk).

Lodge, J. M. (2015). The brain on campus: Can neuroscience contribute to innovation in higher education? Learning and Teaching Unit Seminar, University of South Australia. (invited talk).

Lodge, J. M. & Kennedy, G. E. (2015). Why being confused is beneficial for learning. ARC-SRI Science of Learning Research Centre Seminar, University of Melbourne. (public seminar).

Timms, M. & Lodge, J. M. (2015). Assessment in interactive learning environments. Australian Council for Education Research Conference 2015, Melbourne, Australia. (invited talk)

Lodge, J. M. (2015). The learning sciences and higher education… and never the twain shall meet? Research Roundtable, Institute for Teaching and Learning, University of Sydney (invited talk).